DAVID BATCHELOR MINIMALISM PDF

Visit How to get here Accessibility David Batchelor is best known for his vividly-coloured sculptural installations of illuminated lightboxes, industrial dollies and other found objects. These three-dimensional works perhaps belie the fact that the root of his interest is and always has been in drawing, painting, abstraction and the monochrome — preoccupations that are best charted in his immensely varied two-dimensional work. Having originally studied painting, Batchelor has, over the last 20 years, made colour his leitmotif. Not the colour found in nature, but the synthetic colour of the illuminated street sign and lurid glare of the nocturnal metropolis.

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A seven meter stack of colored light boxes on a tall steel rack stretches from floor to roof beams. A cascade of black electrical cords falls down the back. Batchelor reconstructs the urban clutter of lighted signs into a modern day totem pole with an unfussy, ad-hoc functionalism.

As in his tower, the mechanism that produces the light effect is obvious. Less mystical than the light art of James Turrell, whose effects are made to appear as if by magic, more down to earth than the techno-fetishist minimalism of Dan Flavin, Batchelor uses found light boxes from old signs, relishing the grimy mechanisms behind the pretty lights, playing one off the other in a street smart, pop-art light show.

His three-dimensional works mostly combine brilliant colours using fluorescent light, neon, plastics, etc with a range of found light-industrial materials steel shelving, commercial lightboxes, warehouse dollies, etc. Current Research David is currently developing a number of projects relating to his research into colour and urbanism.

Having worked mainly with acrylic, vinyl, fluorescent light, gells, household paints and modified industrial readymades such as warehouse dollies, lightboxes and steel shelving, he has recently begun to research the properties of computer generated and projected colour.

The results of this new research and other recent three-dimensional and photographic works were shown at the Ikon Gallery, Birmingham, early in Save it. The blast of color coming from the column of odd monochrome light boxes was unremitting. Lest the work appear Minimalist, dozens of electric cables were left hanging down, each one buzzing as it imported electricity to its respective light box. These wires, along with the distressed look of the found boxes, gave the work its funk.

The boxes Batchelor uses are scavenged exit signs an objet trouve from the industrial backyards of London , each with a slick sheet of colored Perspex covering its front. In this work an assortment of lipstick pinks rubbed up against lemon yellows and pale turquoises, different combinations of which were unsystematically repeated up and down the tower.

Complementing the interplay of hue, there was also great variance in surface. Some of the Perspex sheets were quite translucent on occasion even the light tube inside the box was visible. Others were relatively opaque, and so established a firmer plane that resisted the gaze. Besides the pitch of color, the objectness of the units was also affected by the nature of these plastic surfaces. When translucent, they felt lighter and, oddly enough, worked more three-dimensionally; when opaque, the tower was all surface.

Which is not to say that their use of color and surface is not specific: the nuance in its pitching and weighting sees to that. Besides its optical presence, which is so powerful as to have an instant physical effect on the viewer, Electric Colour Tower also had a significant art-historical impact which only revealed itself upon reflection.

In a sly moment, Duchamp once bemoaned of his archenemy in the stakes of the avant-garde: "take a migraine tablet for your Matisse.

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Movements in Modern art: Minimalism

A seven meter stack of colored light boxes on a tall steel rack stretches from floor to roof beams. A cascade of black electrical cords falls down the back. Batchelor reconstructs the urban clutter of lighted signs into a modern day totem pole with an unfussy, ad-hoc functionalism. As in his tower, the mechanism that produces the light effect is obvious. Less mystical than the light art of James Turrell, whose effects are made to appear as if by magic, more down to earth than the techno-fetishist minimalism of Dan Flavin, Batchelor uses found light boxes from old signs, relishing the grimy mechanisms behind the pretty lights, playing one off the other in a street smart, pop-art light show.

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David Batchelor

The history of painted squares in Western art appears to be approximately as follows. A breakthrough, as now Malevich dispenses with the frankly unnecessary other colour. Okay, where do I stash my clothes? Note : must reread Alan W Watts. This was indeed a mystical holy grail for avant-gardists in the 20th century, to try and remove themselves from being hi-jacked by the filth of commerce, the loud brutality of politics and the horror of psychology.

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Minimalism

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