MANSOA ALLIACEA PDF

Ajos sacha is an evergreen tropical shrubby vine that is native to the Amazon rainforest. It can either be described as a shrub or a vine since it produces numerous woody vines from the root that grow only m tall and form a shrub-like appearance. It is cataloged under two main Latin names, Mansoa alliacea and Pseudocalymma alliaceum, although several other synonyms are used as well. In the tropics and in the Amazon rainforest, the leaves are even used as a condiment or spice for its garlic flavor and odor.

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Ajos sacha is an evergreen tropical shrubby vine that is native to the Amazon rainforest. It can either be described as a shrub or a vine since it produces numerous woody vines from the root that grow only m tall and form a shrub-like appearance.

It is cataloged under two main Latin names, Mansoa alliacea and Pseudocalymma alliaceum, although several other synonyms are used as well. In the tropics and in the Amazon rainforest, the leaves are even used as a condiment or spice for its garlic flavor and odor.

Ajos sacha produces bright green leaves up to 15 cm long and beautiful deep lavender flowers with a white throat that fade to a pale lavender, then to almost white. All three flower colors can be found on the plant simultaneously. Its compact habitat and pretty continuous flowers make it a popular ornamental plant in gardens in the tropics.

Ajos sacha is properly classified in the Mansoa taxon which include about 15 other species some of which also smell like garlic and are distributed throughout tropical South America. Ajos sacha can be found growing wild in the tropical rainforests of Brazil, Ecuador, Peru, the three Guyanas, as well as Costa Rica.

It is especially abundant in the forests alongside the Amazon, Ucayali and Madre de Dios rivers in the Peruvian Amazon.

The Shipibo-Conibo Indians give a tea of bark to dogs to make them good hunters and also drink the tea themselves to bring good luck when hunting or fishing. Oftentimes, ajos sacha can be found as an adjunctive ingredient in the hallucinogenic potion the shamans use in spiritual ceremonies called ayahuasca. It is added to the brew to drive away evil spirits, or to purify the blood and body to make the ayahuasca more readily accepted.

Ajos sacha is also used as a medicine by the Indian tribes in the Amazon. The Shipibo-Conibo prepare the bark into a poultice to use on bumps, swellings and inflammatory conditions of the skin. They prepare the bark in an infusion or the leaves in a decoction for rheumatism, arthritis, colds, uterine disorders, inflammation and epilepsy. The root is prepared in a cane alcohol tincture as an overall regenerative whole-body tonic.

The Wayapi put the leaves in a bath to treat feverish conditions. The Creoles in Guyana use the leaves in baths for cramps and fatigue and the Tapajos in Brazil use it in baths for body aches and the flu.

Ajos sacha is also quite well known and popular in the cities and towns in the Amazon and has a long history of use in herbal medicine systems in Peru and Brazil. It is considered analgesic, anti-inflammatory, and antirheumatic and widely used for arthritis, rheumatism, body aches and pain, and muscle aches, injuries and pain. The bark is typically prepared in a tincture or a decoction for these types of conditions, but the leaves are used similarly for the same conditions as well.

In addition, the leaves of ajos sacha are also a common remedy for colds, flu, pneumonia, coughs, fever, and headaches. The leaves are generally prepared as an infusion or decoction. The root is also prepared in a tincture or a cold maceration soaking it in cold water for days and taken as a general whole-body tonic.

It is these compounds which are responsible for the garlic-like odor and taste of ajos sacha. They have been well studied and some even turn into drugs. They have been documented to kill bacteria, viruses, fungi, parasites and cancer cells, lower blood pressure, protect the heart, lower cholesterol, reduce inflammation, reduce blot clots, and counteract atherosclerosis. The wood of the vine was reported to contain two lapachone chemicals which are well known plant chemicals of the Bignoniaceae family and documented with anticancerous and antimicrobial actions.

Ajos sacha is also a good source of another well-known natural compound called ursolic acid. This natural terpene chemical has been documented with cellular protective actions lungs, kidneys, liver and brain , anabolic effects on skeletal muscles and the ability to suppress bone density loss leading to osteoporosis, as well as antimicrobial, antiparasitic, anti-inflammatory and antioxidant actions. Chemicals reported in ajos sacha thus far include: ethyl-cholestenbeta-ol, 3-beta-hydroxy-ursenoic acid, alliin, allyl sulfides, alpha 4-hydroxymethoxy-lapachone, alpha 9-methoxy-lapachone, apigenins, aspartic acid, beta-sitosterol, beta amyrin, beta-peltoboykinolic acid, cosmosiin, cyanidino-beta-d-rutinoside, daucosterol, diallyl sulfides, 3-vinyl-dithiene, 3-vinyl-dithiene, dithiacyclopentene, dotriacontanol, fucosterol, glutamic acid, glycyrrhetol, hentriacontanes, hexacosanol, hexatriacontans, leucine, luteolin, n-nonacosane, octenol, octacosanol, pentatriacontenol, scutellareino-beta-d-glucuronide, stigmasterol, triacontanol, triallyl sulfides, trithiacyclohexene, n-tritriacontane, and ursolic acid.

In research published in , a water extract of ajos sacha leaves was reported to have an antioxidant effect which was attributed to the anthocyanin compounds found in the plant. These antioxidant actions were independently reported by other researchers in studies published in , , and Several of these studies reported very strong antioxidant actions and attributed them to the isolated and tested organosulfur compounds and ursolic acid instead.

The study additionally reported very strong pain-relieving effects in mice that should be studied further. Ajos sacha has also been reported with antimicrobial actions against fungi, plant viruses, and bacteria which may help explain its long-standing use for colds, flu, pneumonia and other upper respiratory infections.

One of these studies published in said the antifungal action of a crude ajos sacha leaf extract equaled that of a leading antifungal drug clotrimazole at very low dosages.

These researchers also tested the leaf extract against head lice and lung cancer cells with very positive results for both at very low dosages. They summarized their research saying ajos sacha should continue to be studied for possible new antifungal, cancer and anti-lice drugs based on the results they achieved. In addition to killing lice, other research published in reported an essential oil of ajos sacha leaves was highly effective at both killing and repelling white flies that are a problem pest in commercial tomato crops in South America.

But research published in indicates that the anticancer actions could also be coming from the organosulfur compounds. A third research group published a preliminary in vitro study in that just showed a crude leaf extract was active at low dosages against a mouse cancer cell line.

Some capsule products of the leaves are sold in stores in Brazil and Peru, and it can be found as an ingredient in other various multi-herb formulas for cold and flu, pain, inflammation and arthritis in general. The use of ajos sacha is just catching on here in the U. Ajos Sacha Plant Summary analgesic, anti-inflammatory, antitussive, antirheumatic, antimicrobial Main Uses: 1.

Traditional Preparation: Generally, if the bark is prepared into a natural remedy, a decoction or tincture method is used. The leaves are thought to have best the broad spectrum actions and generally they are prepared into decoctions, tinctures, and capsules. Contraindications: None reported.

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Mansoa alliacea

Pseudocalymma sagotti Mansoa alliacea Distribution and habitat: Mansoa alliacea is an evergreen climbing plant native to tropical South America, where it grows wild in the tropical rainforests of Brazil, Ecuador, Peru, the Guianas and in Costa Rica. It is especially abundant in the forests near the Amazon, Ucayali and in the Peruvian Amazon. It grows into a semi-woody vine that attaches itself around the trunk of a large tree for support as it climbs skywards to reach for sunlight. The terminal leaflet of this plant is often modified into a tendril that helps the vine to cling onto a support. Description: Mansoa alliacea is an ornamental evergreen vine,

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